Prioritize The Welfare of Others

He will not allow your foot to slip; He who keeps you will not slumber.

[PSALM 121:3]

Bob McAllister met Rusty Wellborn on death row. Bob was the Assistant to the Governor of South Carolina; Rusty was an inmate. Bob was a Christian man who routinely visited death row to talk to prisoners. And Rusty was one of the worst. He had been physically and emotionally abused, and had never known a loving home. He had been on death row for ten years for a brutal crime spree that involved four murders. The first few times Bob visited, Rusty never spoke. He lay curled up on the floor, broken, filthy and unresponsive. Gradually, Bob got him to talk, and eventually, to read the Bible with him. Weeks and months passed, but finally God broke through—and Rusty Wellborn received Jesus Christ. When all appeals for Rusty’s life were exhausted, an execution day was set. Bob visited him the night before, and Rusty asked him to read from the Bible until he fell asleep. When Rusty’s breathing was even and his eyes closed, Bob closed the Bible, crept over to Rusty’s bunk, pulled up the blanket and gently kissed him on the cheek. The next day as he was led to his death, Rusty turned to the guard who was escorting him, and said, “It’s sad, isn’t it, that a man has to wait until his last night on earth to be kissed and tucked in?”

When we receive Jesus Christ, it is as if we are kissed and tucked in each night by the Holy Spirit. He watches over us, and makes our sleep sweet. But we are also to “kiss and tuck in” one another—as Bob did for Rusty, to show the love and compassion of Christ at every opportunity. Rusty was right: no one should have to wait until his last night on earth to be kissed and tucked in.

~ Dr. Edwin Young ~

Streams in The Desert

 

Revelation 21:10

Life is a steep climb, and it is always encouraging to have those ahead of us “call back” and cheerfully summon us to higher ground. We all climb together, so we should help one another.

The mountain climbing of life is serious, but glorious, business; it takes strength and steadiness to reach the summit. And as our view becomes better as we gain altitude, and as we discover things of importance, we should “call back” our encouragement to others.

If you have gone a little way ahead of me, call back—

It will cheer my heart and help my feet along the stony track;

And if, perhaps, Faith’s light is dim, because the oil is low,

Your call will guide my lagging course as wearily I go.

Call back, and tell me that he went with you into the storm;

Call back, and say he kept you when the forest’s roots were torn;

That, when the heavens thunder and the earthquake shook the hill,

He bore you up and held you where the lofty air was still.

O friend, call back, and tell me for I cannot see your face;

They say it glows with triumph, and your feet sprint in the race;

But there are mists between us and my spirit eyes are dim,

And I cannot see the glory, though I long for word of him.

But if you’ll say he heard you when your prayer was but a cry,

And if you’ll say he saw you through the night’s sin-darkened sky—

If you have gone a little way ahead, O friend, call back—

It will cheer my heart and help my feet along the stony track.

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