Streams in The Desert

Esther 4:16

Those people God uses most to bring glory to himself are those who are completely broken, for the sacrifice he accepts is a “broken and contrite heart” (Psalm 51:17). It was not until Jacob’s natural strength was broken, when “his hip was wrenched” (Genesis 32:25) at Peniel, that he came to the point where God could clothe him with spiritual power …

It was not until Gideon’s three hundred specially chosen soldiers “broke the jars that were in their hands” (Judges 7:19), which symbolized brokenness in their lives, that the hidden light of the torches shone forth, bringing terror to their enemies. It was once the poor widow broke the seal on her only remaining jar of oil and began to pour it that God miraculously multiplied it to pay her debts … (see 2 Kings 4:1–7). It was not until Esther risked her life and broke through the strict laws of a heathen king’s court that she obtained favor to rescue her people from death (see Esther 4:16).

It was once Jesus took “the five loaves … and broke them” (Luke 9:16) that the bread was multiplied to feed the five thousand. Through the very process of the loaves being broken, the miracle occurred. It was when Mary broke her beautiful “alabaster jar of very expensive perfume” (Matthew 26:7), destroying its future usefulness and value, that the wonderful fragrance filled the house. And it was when Jesus allowed his precious body to be broken by thorns, nails and a spear that his inner life was poured out like an ocean of crystal-clear water, for thirsty sinners to drink and then live.

… And so it has always been, down through the history of plants, people and all of spiritual life—God uses BROKEN THINGS.

Those who have been gripped by the power of the Holy Spirit and are used for God’s glory are those who have been broken in their finances, broken in their self-will, broken in their ambitions, broken in their lofty ideals, broken in their worldly reputation, broken in their desires and often broken in their health.

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